Washington State Looks At ‘Canada’ Infrastructure Bank Money For High-Speed Rail

Infrastructure bank could force us to pay fees & tolls to foreign banks and foreign governments to use infrastructure funded by our own tax dollars.

The government of Washington State is looking at the Canada Infrastructure Bank as a source of funds for a high-speed rail line between Vancouver and the Northwest United States.

As reported by CTV, “It’s (Washington State) looking at the infrastructure bank as a potential financing option for a long-discussed high-speed rail connection between Portland, Seattle and Vancouver, says one of the governor’s senior policy advisers.

Charles Knutson, an adviser for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, said Ottawa’s infrastructure bank will be analyzed as a financing option in an ongoing feasibility study for the rail proposal.”

The idea of the high-speed rail line itself is good. It would create jobs and help deepen ties with an important economic region. That said, the infrastructure bank is a huge problem.

While it’s called the ‘Canada’ Infrastructure Bank, it’s really a tool to serve private investors – including foreign banks and foreign governments. This means that all the risk is borne by Canadian taxpayers if a project fails. Additionally, investors want a long-term source of profit, meaning Canadians will be paying tolls that will go to people outside our country. So, the infrastructure won’t truly be Canadian.

In the case of the Washington State project, Canadians could be paying tolls that go to a U.S. State and foreign investors, rather than to Canada. Of course, it doesn’t have to be this way. There is a reason we have the Bank of Canada, as it makes far more sense for our own country to fund our own infrastructure, and then pay that money back through tolls or fees that stay within our country. National infrastructure should be funded by the national government, not foreign banks or foreign governments. And a joint project between Canada and the U.S. could include a mix of Canadian infrastructure spending and U.S. infrastructure spending – without Canadian taxpayers paying tolls that go to foreign banks.

Who owns our country?

This comes down to the fundamental question of who owns our country. The globalist elites have an agenda that serves organizations that are “above” nation-states. International banks preach the importance of “breaking down investment barriers,” but what they really mean is letting countries be bought and sold off. There is something fundamentally important about our national infrastructure being owned by our country, which means we have direct influence and control over it. While I’m no fan of most Canadian politicians, I would much rather see infrastructure controlled by politicians in our own country, as opposed to a foreign banker half a world away.

The obsession with “globalizing” everything must come to an end. The agenda of concentrating wealth and power in the biggest banks and the most well-connected elites has failed miserably, as evidenced by the total lack of real wage growth in the last 40 years, and the massive rise in debt accompanying that stagnation. Canada must own our infrastructure, and we must not let our country be taken out from under our feet by globalist banks and other governments that don’t have our interests at heart and are not responsive to the demands of our citizens.

Spencer Fernando

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6 comments Add yours
  1. If the infrastructure bank financed American Airlines to enable them to expand should Canadian taxpayers get free tickets?

  2. The garbage that continues to spew from the infected brain of this idiot Trudeau is shocking. He is acting like a dictator. He and his treasonous jihadist Liberals have to be stopped.

  3. The idiot in Ottawa needs to be thrown out while there is still something left of this country.

    This sounds like a direct sell-out to the one-world government types, and is likely JT’s attempt (at our expense) to butter up his buddies in the UN.

    This insanity HAS to stop!!

    1. I’m convinced this country will be almost permanently ruined at the hands of this incompetent and treacherous clown if he is allowed to “serve” out his full term.
      BTW..he sure as hell isn’t serving Canadians.

      1. Providing backing for an interlinking rail system makes sense if the volume is there. It would be similar to the Chunnel between London and Paris.
        It would be better than the present slower and intermittent Amtrak and bus between Vancouver and Seattle. As to the fee issue, Canadians already pay for tickets to out of country Amtrak and inter city buses.

  4. The ability of two countries working together to coordinate financing and construction can best be illustrated by the Chunnel that links London and Paris. Banks on both continents shared in the financing of the worlds largest infrastructure project to date.
    To this date the link serves as a passenger and commercial connector adding value and deepening ties to economic regions in both the UK and France, into the ECM and beyond.
    http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr11/pdf/f46_gra.pdf
    A link between Washington State and British Columbia would greatly enhance travel and commerce along the west coast and to the interior of both countries.
    Financing would for fiscal reasons only be in part by the infrastructure bank though the return to federal coffers is virtually guaranteed.
    Full financing by issuance of Canada bonds would overly strain Canadas credit rating capacity, add significant debt that already limits repayment capabilities and further increase the deficits or reduce surpluses going forward.
    Prudent foresight suggests that there are many infrastructure projects facing Canada over the next 15 years that require reserving and rationing fiscal capacity to service whatever small portion of debt is required.

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