Trudeau’s Constantly Escalating Beer Tax Will Hurt Canada’s Economy

Canada’s beer industry supports almost 150,000 jobs and sales are concentrated in local breweries. As a result, Trudeau’s plan to increase beer taxes every year will hurt an important Canadian industry.

The Trudeau government never saw a tax they didn’t want to increase.

Those tax increases may put more money in the hands of politicians, but they hurt the rest of us, and damage the economy.

That’s certainly the case with Trudeau’s ever-escalating beer tax.

The Trudeau government raised the tax on beer in 2017, increasing it 2%, and setting permanent increases every year.

While the government claims the increases will be in line with inflation, many Canadians don’t get inflation-adjusted pay raises every year, and the government will have an incentive to use the highest possible measure of inflation they have in order to extract more revenue.

As usual, when something costs more people will buy less of it, which means the Canadian beer industry will take a big hit.

And considering the fact that the industry supports almost 150,000 jobs and contributes $13.6 to the GDP of our country, a weaker Canadian beer industry will hurt our national economy.

Making things more outrageous, Beer Canada notes that Canada already has one of the highest beer taxes on earth, with taxes making up 47% of the cost of beer.

Hurting a Made-In-Canada industry

85% of all beer consumed in Canada is made in Canada, so the escalating beer tax will hurt a homegrown Canadian industry. It will disproportionately damage local companies, while big producers will be more easily able to absorb costs.

This will lead to further concentration of ownership of the industry in fewer hands, and will also increase foreign-ownership of the beer industry, further reducing Canadian control.

Finally, the increasing Trudeau beer tax will mean more money taken out of the pockets of Canadian consumers, at a time when millions of people are already struggling to hold on financially.

For all these reasons, the Trudeau beer tax should be opposed. Beer Canada has created a petition calling on the finance minister to Axe the Beer Tax, which can be viewed below:

AXE THE BEER TAX PETITION

Sign & share the petition to help spread the word.

Spencer Fernando

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8 comments Add yours
  1. It is time for Canadians to aspire higher. We need to get rid of this left, depressing loon before he totally destroys Canada. We Canadians are far to good of a people to settle for Justine Trudeau , his motly crew of morons.

  2. I make my own, I just got in from my shop after putting another batch of my honey porter. Only problem is, I’m out and his one will not be ready for at least a month. Oh well I’ll just pay the tax and buy local small brewery beer, beats the big names hands down.

  3. When GST liberal taxes came in I was in business doing the books, a Canadian small business (25 employees) we had been doing very well. When I added up the biggest asset and expense our business had usually the employees we needed and would have loved to give them another raise they deserved it. once the GST was added to our already high business taxes paying the governments was our biggest expense with all 34 different licenses and permits etc. they charge along with the high taxes. We like a lot of businesses went out of business after making no money personally( we had bills to pay as well personally) we tried our best to keep all working, a lot of business went to work under the table or sold out to big business if lucky, we also looked at going to the USA (even then their taxes and red tape were less) but our children were all in high school and university so we went to work at big companies and built up our hobby farm, and closed our business. Yes keep voting Liberal for more taxes and government debt that’s interest payments cost more than our health care and school system in a year.

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